Community Action Projects


Community Action Projects are action research projects funded by RPIRG and coordinated through the Community Research Unit in the Faculty of Arts at the U of R. These projects seek to provide students with the resources to undertake a mutually beneficial project with a group in their community. They are not, necessarily, traditional research projects, but stimulate learning and education in much the same way through action instead of observation.

 

Current Projects

Campus Living Wage Feasibility Study

The goal of this project is to create a feasibility study for a university-wide living wage initiative. A living wage is described as the minimum income needed to meet a workers basic needs. In Saskatchewan the living wage is deemed to be $16.46/hour. It is our hope that this project will move the University of Regina a few steps closer to becoming a living wage campus.

Partners in the project include:

  • Naomi Beingessner – Community Research Unit
  • Andrew Stevens- Dept of Sociology and Faculty of Business
  • Kent Peterson- Saskatchewan Federation of Labour
  • Sarah Cibart- Action Researcher
  • Christell Simeon- Action Researcher

 

Past Projects

U-Pass Implementation at the University of Regina

The goal of this project was to compile information about the universal bus pass (U-Pass) program in other cities and create a cost-recovery analysis and social return on investment forecast for a potential U-Pass program in Regina. The results were compiled in a report which served as a resource to the U-Pass campaign and the URSU U-Pass committee, as they continue to work towards having a U-Pass for the University of Regina students.

A copy of the report can be found here and on our resources page.

Partners in the Project included:

  • Larissa Flister- Action Researcher

Campus Composting Feasibility Study

The goal of this project was to create a feasibility study for a university-wide composting plan. First, waste audits and composting pilot projects at the university are reviewed. Then, exploration of other compost programs on other campuses, communities, large institutions and businesses leads to ideas of best practices. Results will be disseminated throughout the Regina community for the use of organizations and similar institutions.

A copy of the report can be found here and on our resources page.

Partners in the project include:

Mapping Corporate Power Project

This project researches and maps the primary ways and means through which corporate influence is exercised over public policy formulation and/or implementation in Saskatchewan. By understanding how public policy is actually produced and implemented, we can share this with the community to improve public engagement and the effectiveness of community input into policy.

The final report, “Mapping Corporate Power in Saskatchewan” traces the ties between the major corporate contributors to both the Saskatchewan Party and the New Democratic Party, and their links to other corporate interest and advocacy groups. The research demonstrates that Saskatchewan corporations have the networks, the committed leadership, the organization, and the access to government to play a large role in shaping public policy. As record amounts of corporate money flood our political system, Saskatchewan urgently needs a publicly accessible lobbyist registry to let citizens track corporate lobbying. As one of the few provinces that do not currently have a lobbyist registry, Saskatchewan is vulnerable to the perception that corporations have undue influence over both major political parties.

Partners in the project include:

North Central Community History Project Online Mapping Component

This community history project first focused on researching and writing profiles of important contemporary and historical residents from North Central, and our next phase was to make this information publicly available through a website hosted by NCCA. In our process of research, we uncovered lots of little tidbits – old newspapers, photographs, names and addresses of important people and businesses – in addition to the more comprehensive profiles.

The new project is an interactive historical map of the neighbourhood on this website. Using google maps or other user-friendly software, this map features information (like links to complete profiles, scanned images from newspapers, historical photos and maps, historical trivia) tagged to specific locations. The community (North Central and otherwise) can interact with this map by commenting on information and being able to add (or request an addition) their own historical information. This website allows the project partners to share our exciting research with the public.

Check out the map here.

Partners in the project include:

North Central Community History Project Profiles Component

This collaborative community action project compiled and publicized written profiles of important historical and contemporary public figures from the North Central neighbourhood. The goal of this project is to promote pride in the community through increased awareness of the contributions of current and former neighbourhood residents in the fields of politics, sports & recreation and arts & culture. All profiles were publicized within the neighbourhood, through a website.

Partners in the project include:


Crime Free Multi-Housing Project

This community development project focuses on improvement of the quality and safety of rental housing in Regina through the Crime-Free Multi-Housing program. Once information has been collected, it will be compiled in an accessible and easily understood literature review with the purpose of sharing it with the Regina Police Services and other community stakeholders.

The Crime Free Multi-Housing Program is a state-of-the-art, crime prevention program designed to reduce crime, drugs, and gangs on multi-dwelling properties. This program was successfully developed at the Mesa Arizona Police Department in 1992 and implemented in Canada in 1994. The International Crime Free Multi-Housing Program has spread to nearly 2,000 cities in 44 U.S. states, 5 Canadian Provinces, and other countries. The program consists of three phases that must be completed under the supervision of the local police department. Property managers can become individually certified after completing training in each phase and the property becomes certified upon successful completion of all three phases.

Partners in the project include:

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